1980s / 1990s / Future classic / Japanese / Nissan

Is the Nissan Patrol (Y60) a future classic?

nissan-patrol-y60-2The Patrol nameplate helped Nissan forge a reputation for building rugged SUVs that can go just about anywhere. Launched in 1987, the fourth-generation Patrol Y60 was less rudimentary than the outgoing 260 series in order to cater to increasingly demanding buyers. Still, the Y60 was far from today’s pavement-dwelling luxury ‘utes and it was primarily designed as a work truck.

Offered as both a short-wheelbase two-door and a long-wheelbase four-door, the Y60 boasted a wide array of potent gasoline- and diesel-burning engines and, of course, body-on-frame construction. It featured coil springs all around, rear disc brakes and most models were fitted with a limited-slip differential. In short, it was just as capable off-road as its predecessor but slightly more comfortable to drive daily on paved surfaces.

Unlike the Toyota 80-Series Land Cruiser, one of its fiercest rivals, the Y60 was never offered in the United States but it enjoyed a loyal clientele in Europe throughout its ten-year long production run. Today, the Patrol still trades hands for fairly high amounts considering its age but it is generally seen as little more than a work truck that comes in handy when gathering firewood, going hunting or hauling around bales of hay. Will it join the original Range Rover and the Toyota FJ40 in the ranks of collectible SUVs, or will it always remain nothing more than a capable work mule?

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2 thoughts on “Is the Nissan Patrol (Y60) a future classic?

  1. Pingback: Future classic: The provisional rankings | Ran When Parked

  2. Pingback: Mercedes w124 crowned RWP’s future classic of the year | Ran When Parked

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