1960s / Citroen / Hillman / Mercedes-Benz / Opel / Renault

Hillman Husky.

As many of you guessed correctly the mystery car is a Hillman Husky. We’ll post another mystery car soon but in the meantime, have a look at other cars rotting in the same Utah junkyard as the Husky.

The Opel Manta was launched in 1970 and production of first generation cars like the one below stopped in 1975. Buick dealers sold Opels on the U.S. market and the Manta could be ordered with a 1600cc or a 1900cc.

     Launched in 1961, the Renault Floride (or Caravelle in the U.S.) sat on a Dauphine platform and for better or worse used the Dauphine Gordini’s Ventoux engine in 845cc form. The Renault 8’s 1108cc replaced the Ventoux in 1965 and gave the Floride a much-needed boost in power. Production stopped in 1968. (As a side note, some early Renault 4s used a standard Dauphine engine bored out to 845cc; despite having the displacement they were different engines.)

    

The Citroen DS needs no introduction or explanation; besides, it’s already been covered in these pages. This is an early DS19 model.

    
 
Last one, a Mercedes-Benz w110 190D. As its name implies it uses a 1900cc four cylinder diesel that churns out 55 horsepower.

6 thoughts on “Hillman Husky.

  1. >after posting that question I got bored and went digging around on Google Maps and found it out in Grantsville.Worth the trip? Anything worth saving? Or just fun from a 'sad that these cars are rotting here' perspective?thx

  2. >It depends on what you're looking for. The yard is predominently uncommon American cars; Studebakers, Ramblers, Corvairs, etc. As far as European cars go they have two Volvo 544s, a couple of old Jaguar sedans, two Alfa Spiders, a w110 190D, a w180 220S, two Citroen DSs, a Renault Floride, an Opel Manta, a Hillman Husky.. I can't think of what else, I may be missing some.They're sort of peculiar to deal with, it's cash only.Feel free to email me at ranwhenparked@hotmail.com, I can go into more details that way.

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